The Ring

An ocean full of change at Ocean Networks Canada

Wed, 2013-09-04 16:08

RV Falkor
The Schmidt Ocean Institute's RV Falkor research vessel.

Having established the world’s first and largest comprehensive underwater cabled ocean observatories, Ocean Networks Canada continues to expand the scope of its activities. This summer and fall, ONC is taking part in a major cruise investigating low-oxygen zones, adding new capabilities to its Arctic node, participating in a major international trade mission and making substantial enhancements to its website.


Research aims to improve concussion diagnosis, treatment

Mon, 2013-08-26 13:27

Christie
Christie

It’s game night at the local rink and cheering parents pack the stands as young players churn up and down the ice. Every scoring chance is hailed with roars of support. The barn falls eerily silent though, as one young skater racing for a puck loses an edge and slides headlong into the boards.


Five 2013 Vanier scholarships for UVic, including a top spot

Tue, 2013-08-20 14:55

UVic PhD student and 2013 Vanier recipient Tim Personn
Tim Personn, 2013 Vanier scholar CREDIT: Photo Services

The 2013 Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships were announced Sept. 23, 2013, and UVic PhD student Tim Personn (English) is ranked first of all social sciences and humanities recipients.


T2K experiment passes five-sigma threshold

Fri, 2013-07-19 12:59

T2K international experiment based in Japan - Credit: KEK PR office
T2K experiment. Photo: Courtesy of KEK PR office.

On July 19, 2013, the Japan-based T2K experiment announced a significant breakthrough in the study of neutrinos.


Convocation medals and awards, Spring 2013

Thu, 2013-06-06 09:40

Governor-General's Gold Medal (best Doctoral thesis)

Dr. Nathaniel West

PhD, Department of Biochemistry & Microbiology

 

Governor General's Silver Medal (top undergraduate student)

Nigel Burke


Undergraduate research on the way to medical school

Tue, 2013-06-04 16:39

Moller
Moller

As a child, Daniel Moller’s curiosity about the world and how things work led him to take apart old computers and radios.

“I’ve always had a pretty big drive to understand how things work,” says the former Stelly’s Secondary School student. “When I first took a biology class I realized there was this whole other aspect with the human body, which is an incredibly complex, interconnected machine and I wanted to understand how that all fit together, too.”


From Metchosin to UVic, and on to Oxford

Tue, 2013-06-04 16:16

Nathan West in his new lab at Oxford's John Radcliffe Hospital
Nathan West in his new lab at Oxford's John Radcliffe Hospital

Governor General’s Gold Medal: Dr. Nathan West, biochemistry and microbiology

Growing up in rural Metchosin, Nathan West's interest in biology and nature came from walking out the back door.  Play dates were in the woods. For pocket money, West raised chickens and sold their eggs to local bakeries and neighbours.

His boyhood interest in science carried on through high school at Belmont Secondary, and expanded to include human biology as well.


For the love of science

Mon, 2013-06-03 12:42

Patten
Patten

UVic’s first neuroscience program graduate moved to Victoria to study – and she intends to stay.

Anna Patten found UVic’s graduate program in neuroscience, which will confer its first degree to her this June, through love. Not just love of science – but for the young Canadian man she met while working in a British pub.


2013 Craigdarroch Research Awards

Fri, 2013-05-03 11:07

Dr. Pauline van den Driessche
Dr. Pauline van den Driessche

Passion, energy and a commitment to making the world a little bit better tomorrow for everyone—these are the qualities that are shared by each and every recipient of a Craigdarroch Research Award over the past decade, and this year’s slate of recipients is no exception. The 2013 Craigdarroch Research Awards, which honour achievements in research at UVic, were presented at a reception event on May 2.


Thawing permafrost and global warming

Wed, 2013-04-10 13:49

Whiticar. Photo: Nik West
Whiticar. Photo: Nik West

Locked under the surface of Canada’s North for up to 40,000 years lies a frozen layer of permafrost. Here, organic material—the remains of plants and animals—has been deposited layer upon layer in peatlands. Covering an area of about 400,000 km2 or 37 per cent of Canada’s peatlands, this material has remained frozen since the last ice age. Dr. Michael Whiticar (earth and ocean sciences) is investigating what happens as permafrost thaws, relesaing greenhouise gases.