The Ring

New hospital simulation centre enhances health students' learning

Thu, 2015-09-17 13:01

Students and staff from the School of Nursing at the new centre.
Students and staff from the School of Nursing at the new centre.

The tension in the operating room was palpable as the patient’s heart rate skyrocketed unexpectedly during surgery on her fractured ankle. Julie, the 19-year-old soccer player under local anaesthetic, worriedly asked what was wrong. The medical and nursing team reassured her as they quickly assessed and took action to stabilize her condition.

Despite its location in the Royal Jubilee Hospital, this was not a typical operating room. Nor was Julie a typical patient; she’s actually a life-like mannequin. Both are part of the new $2.9-million Centre for Interprofessional Clinical Simulation Learning, a partnership between UVic’s School of Nursing, UBC’s Faculty of Medicine and Island Health.

Galiano Island field school breathes new life into learning

Tue, 2015-09-08 14:47

Student at field school. Photo: UVic photo services
Student at field school. Photo: UVic photo services

In July, under a blistering hot sun, 15 students and environmental studies professor Dr. Eric Higgs waited to embark on a unique learning adventure at the Galiano Island Land Conservancy Learning Centre.

During the following week, as part of the Ecological Restoration field school, the students share meals together and work intensely on group projects—off the grid, with no internet, and with the outdoor environment of the island’s District Lot 57 as their principal classroom. The lot, owned by the Galiano Island Conservancy Association, was once an active logging  and farming site. But now, it’s home to the Learning Centre, and Galiano Island residents want the land ecologically restored. That’s where the thinking, learning and labors of the students in the field school come in.

UVic student heads to Australia on first Indigenous co-op exchange

Tue, 2015-09-08 14:42

Elder May Sam providing guidance to Hanton. Credit: UVic photo services
Elder May Sam providing guidance to Hanton. Credit: UVic photo services

When UVic student Kimberly Hanton packed her bags for her work term in Australia last month, she carried words of encouragement from the local Indigenous Elders. Hanton recently embarked on the university’s first Indigenous co-op exchange after attending a departure ceremony at First Peoples House in her honour.

This unique co-op exchange saw Hanton travel to the University of Newcastle in Australia in August, while UVic will welcome Australian Indigenous student Cristal Walters to campus this fall. 

Holocaust education in a time of transition

Thu, 2015-09-03 10:58

l-r: Schallié, Thorson, van Noord. Credit: Photo Services.

What will the Holocaust mean to new generations in the 21st century? This summer, the world saw shocking film footage of Edward VIII in 1933 teaching the Nazi salute to the Queen as a young girl in the same year Hitler came to power in Germany, with subsequent international media coverage putting pressure on the royal family to open its archives and also raising important questions about a real risk of losing the educational legacies of the 1940s.

As home to the I-witness Holocaust Field School (the first of its kind for undergraduate students at a Canadian university) and the UVic Holocaust Archive, UVic hosted a global gathering early this month to explore Holocaust education as a means to tackle contemporary issues of hatred, racism, antisemitism, islamophobia, xenophobia, ethnic conflict and genocide.

Reclaiming a banned Saanich fishery

Tue, 2015-08-04 13:33

A scene from the 2014 sailing
A scene from the 2014 sailing

Almost a decade ago, XEMŦOLTW̱ Nick Claxton told his family he wanted to revitalize the reef net fishery, a fishing practice unique to the Straits Salish people and banned by the colonial government 100 years ago.

His uncle advised: “You can’t just go fishing. You must first build a ceremonial net.” And so began the spiritual, cultural and educational journey that Claxton considers his life’s work. It also became his PhD dissertation in curriculum and instruction at the University of Victoria—a research study designed to revitalize the knowledge, ceremony and practice that was nearly lost.

Taking academia underwater

Mon, 2015-06-08 13:15

Irvine. Credit: UVic Photo Services.
Irvine. Credit: UVic Photo Services.

Education grad Mike Irvine took academia beneath the waves for his scuba-diving master's defence

When education grad student Mike Irvine first posed his master’s project research question to his advisor, the idea struck Jason Price as a humourous oxymoron. Irvine wanted to explore how technology could be used as a tool to reconnect kids to nature. 

New co-op funding

Thu, 2015-06-04 13:38

The BC government has announced $6 million in funding (provided through the BC Innovation Council) for students to receive job training in the technology sector.

David Foster, 2015 Distinguished Entrepreneur of the Year

Thu, 2015-06-04 13:36

David Foster with students
David Foster with students

Most university lectures start with an illustrious speaker at a podium, poised to impart knowledge to students. That cliché was turned upside down by this year’s Gustavson School of Business Distinguished Entrepreneur of the Year, David Foster, when he recently spoke to Business and Fine Arts students: not only was this class far from a traditional lecture, but the students were engaged and energized right from the start.

After the screening of a video about his career, Foster sat behind a keyboard (“I’ll play if you beg me … and even if you don’t.”) in a lecture theatre.

“So. Business. Let’s talk. Questions?” It didn’t take long before a brisk, incisive, vibrant interchange got underway.

Thai co-op quenches law grad’s thirst for international experience

Thu, 2015-06-04 12:15

Dean of Law Jeremy Webber, Anna Beatch and Al Chandler in the Chandler & Thong-e
Dean of Law Jeremy Webber, Anna Beatch and Al Chandler in the Chandler & Thong-ek offices in Bankok.

Anna Beatch doesn’t like to plan too far ahead, and that feeds her thirst for adventure. She likes a challenge, which is why she chose UVic Law after receiving her undergrad commerce and business law degree from the University of Alberta. “I wanted to challenge myself and push my boundaries,” says Beatch. “I also chose UVic Law because of the co-op program.”

Co-ops give health info sciences grad a competitive edge

Thu, 2015-06-04 12:07


For Emily Mailes of Melbourne, Australia, deciding what to study was a daunting process. “I was not one of those people who always knew what they wanted to do.” 

Six years post-high school and having relocated to Victoria, Emily decided to pick a path and move forward with her life. “UVic’s School of Health Information Sciences stood out,” she says. A relative is a grad who now has an interesting and lucrative career. The global opportunities across the tech sector held considerable appeal along with the school’s promise of guaranteed placement upon graduation.